the-uncluded-hokey-fright

The Uncluded- Hokey Fright

Kimya Dawson & Aesop Rock come together as The Uncluded to create the collaborative album Hokey Fright.

At first I was a little hesitant, not knowing what to expect from the unusual collaboration. It was like I was listening to nursery rhymes dubbed over by a rap artist.

The fuse of Kimya’s sweet melancholy singing with Aesop Rock’s stern vocals complete 16 tracks on Hokey Fright. They both deliver clever verses over quirky instrumentals which make for a creative mash-up. While Kimya sweetly sings her way through the tracks, Aesop uses word play masterfully. Tracks like “Teleprompters” and “Delicate Cycle” provide lighthearted instrumentals, while the musicians deliver thought-provoking verses. Meanwhile at the opposite pole, “Superheroes” & “WYHUOM” are carefree and playful tracks.
Some may say that Aesop rapping over Kimya’s strumming guitar and folk singing is awkward, but I believe that this is what makes the album unique and refreshing. Embrace the odd combination! They were destined for greatness once the folk singer and rapper joined forces to create a musical experiment that has set a standard unmet by other artists. This is a perfect album to listen to this summer while riding your bike down the block– headphones in, real world out. Give it a listen!

Anuhea

Anuhea & Justin Young Interview

I had a wonderful chat with Hawaiian reggae music stars Anuhea and Justin Young as they were passing through Northern California, performing at the Reggae in the Hills Festival in Angels Camp. Hear the interview here.

Anuhea & Justin Young have a new song together called Forever Summer; see it below.

 

 

coverffftk-500x500

Loud Rock Charts: 6/4

Break out the bongs. Psych/Stoner Metal band Thinning The Herd is leading this week’s adds for Loud Rock with the album Freedom From The Known St. Marks. Fans of old Black Sabbath, Annihilation Time, and Purple Mercy  should be adequately pleased with this finely crafted piece of music. Production quality and recording goes out to the man, the myth, Steve Albini himself so you know its going to be good. For an extra added bonus, check out their ridiculous music video for “Never Wanted”. STAY TRIPPY.

ADDS:

1 THINNING THE HERD Freedom From The Known St. Marks
2 MEGADETH Super Collider Tradecraft
3 BLACK DAHLIA MURDER “Into The Everblack” [Single] Metal Blade
4 WE BUTTER THE BREAD WITH BUTTER Projekt Herz [EP] Heart Work
5 TIMO TOLKKI’S AVALON Land Of New Hope Frontiers

 

 

CHARTS:

1 DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN One Of Us Is The Killer Sumerian
2 RETOX YPLL Epitaph
3 BLOOD CEREMONY The Eldritch Dark Rise Above
4 ANVIL Hope In Hell The End
5 SODOM Epitome Of Torture SPV
6 DEMON LUNG Hundredth Name Candlelight
7 ENTRAILS Raging Death Metal Blade
8 ALICE IN CHAINS The Devil Put Dinosaurs Here EMI
9 GHOST B.C. Infestissumam Loma Vista
10 OCEAN Pelagial Metal Blade

 

La Conquête du Monde

Have you ever played the board game ‘Risk’? It’s actually pretty fun. This game, invented by French film director Albert Lamorisse, was originally released as La Conquête du Monde in 1957, and it is one of the longest board game you will ever play. Monopoly might also take a pretty long time to finish, but I wouldn’t know.

(Seeing as I’ve never had the patience to finish a game.)

A simple Google search will show you how the list of the longest play time board games all circle around themes that have engulfed humanity for years, and we’ve yet to win the game. Namely, that of gaining power; as we can see in the war theme of Risk, or Axis and Allies, and the economic theme of Monopoly.

It’s been these struggles and flows that have pushed new forms in shaping us. We have the power to turn obstacles into feats.

The music of the world-music; our most creative form of self and collective expression-is hugely reflective of these pressures and radical shifts in our world’s being. I am particularly fond of music from the Caribbean and the Bahamas. The strange and beautiful complexities of a world soup with a flavor absolutely unique to it. Location and history have given development to music with Latin, European, African, and some Native influences. The recent task of organizing our world music collection brought with it the controversies and questions of…”what goes where?”  Where can you make the separations so that it is accurately reflective of the music, and also easy to understand (without needing extensive knowledge of history and geography). The world then isn’t what the world is now. It’s always a “what if” world of possibilities. What if Columbus had better known what he was doing? What if the Taíno people of the Bahamas had a stronger population today? What myriad of styles would could be united? It’s just like when you consider who you are as a person. What if you weren’t ever bullied? What if you hadn’t gone through that “emo” phase? What if your parents had decided not to move into the city after all? What if you hadn’t taken the spontaneous decision to talk to that strange kid from your core class? What if you hadn’t gotten lost and discovered that beautiful park, or that awesome record store? You never know. You can just push through and continue to develop.

Today, the trend towards communication globalization and the spread of the internet means new information and advances can spread fast. “World Music” isn’t just music from different parts of the world, but the world exploring itself through music. Here at KZSC, we might receive music from a French Jazz artist who has been able to explore African and Latin aspects, fallen in love with this artist or style, – which she might not have ever been able to hear about in a different time- delve into the richness of it, and use it to influence her artistic work.  And think of the worldwide society of different tinkerers throughout time! From Ben Franklin’s first work on electricity, russian inventor Leon Theremin’s instrument, and Daphne Oram’s new methods of composition… As well as creating a whole new genre of music, technology has led to interesting electronic takes on traditional folk music. And who takes credit for this? No one country can precisely claim the electronic movement.

Risk, with a world reflection reminiscent of that from George Orwell’s 1984, is a game where players attempt to grab,separate, and hold the world. The power of music seeks to stand tall in its original context, and yet be shared.

As the world changes and struggles; so too it can learn and grow.

deerhunter

Deerhunter – Monomania

Deerhunter / Monomania /  Out via 4AD on May 7th, 2013

Like any well-oiled pop machine, Atlanta’s avant-garage outfit Deerhunter knows when to slowly gas the psych propellers into an ambient blissout, and bust out pedal-to-the-metal spurts of pure punk rock as soon as the lighters get raised. The band’s fifth studio album Monomania dropped May 7th via 4AD, this time forgoing the astral plane explorations of their sonically anarchic back catalog, and opting instead for a more concise pop record that snaps and crackles in equal measure. The interstellar improv and dream pop sensibility that once resonated at galactic proportions in earlier releases is tighter than ever, as though transmissions between ground control and the International Space Station achieved a crystal-clear moment of recognition, to produce a new release that is surprisingly grounded.

Amidst the bray of garage-punk snarls and slow burning shoegaze longplayers of recent days, it’s hard to tell if and when the genetics of alt rock will see the promise of mutation. In a culture-jamming return to form,  frontman Bradford Cox told Rolling Stone that he and guitarist Lockett Pundt listened to only The Ramones and Ricky Nelson prior to making the album, and also cited Pierre Schaeffer, Steve Reich, and Bo Diddley as major influences. In fact, Cox referred to Diddley as “the god of this record,” but added, “I don’t think there’s a single Bo Diddley beat on the album.” Regardless of its precise coordinates, Monomania is a refreshingly relaxed moment amidst the fluorescent junk-pop riffs and celestial loops that combine to form Deerhunter’s weird era of psych-rock ephemera.

Feedback freakouts “Neon Junkyard” and “Leather Jacket II” open the band’s sixth studio album with freshly sharpened bite, pedaling onward without a moment’s fiery respite. Third track “The Missing” casts a synth-soaked ray of sunshine into the shimmering sea of kraut grooves that comprised Pundt’s 2012 release Spooky Action at a Distance, drifting into the hustle and creak of “Pensacola” and “Dream Captain”, freak folk Americana jams sporting a looser, garagey feel that evokes the DIY tape hiss of psych-rock contemporaries Woods. Saloon waltz “T.H.M.”, the meandering strings of “Sleepwalking”, and tightly capped jam “Back in the Middle” tread familiar ground in the newgaze post-explorations of Deerhunter’s back catalog. Five-minute title drone “Monomania” trickles into the cavernous cassette echo of “Nikebike”, proceeding through dirge to draw open the ultraviolet shades of “Punk (La Vie Antérieure)” for a final wave as the sun sets over a decidedly “avant-garde rock & roll record”, according to vocalist Bradford Cox in a recent interview with Rolling Stone. If their 2010 release Halcyon Digest didn’t hammer your tympanic threshold into metronomic submission, let the message ring forevermore that while indie festival darlings are only beginning to touch on the apache anthems and art-rock tinkering of the early 2000’s, Deerhunter continues make giant leaps forward, without all the white noise to mute their sonic footprint.