Chance-The-Rapper-Acid-Rap

From MJ to MJ: Take a Chance on “Acid Rap”

Chancelor Bennett is not old enough to buy alcohol. Chances are (heh), he probably doesn’t remember when mixtapes were actually tapes. Despite all of this, Bennett, better known as Chance the Rapper, recently released his highly-anticipated second tape Acid Rap. Following up his highly-acclaimed first tape 10Day, whose title is a reference to the amount of time he was suspended from school, during which time he recorded it, Acid Rap (whose title comes from the fact that Chance did a whole lot of LSD during the albums writing and recording process) takes his music to another level, filled with scratchy, soulful samples, clever wordplay, and high-profile guest spots. Beginning with uptempo, Beyonce-esque vocals ushering in opening track “Good Ass Intro”, the album oozes good vibes, with a chorus featuring an ecstatic Chance chanting “you did it, you did it/you did a good-ass job” (Fun fact: “Good-Ass Job was a working – and in my opinion much better – title for Kanye West’s 2010 album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy). The album quickly moves into highlight “Pusha Man”, likely a callback to Curtis Mayfield, and a two minute fast-paced banger which quickly ends and we’re left with fifteen seconds of silence before secret track “Paranoia” begins. Here, Chance gets serious for a bit, lamenting the murders that happen every summer in his hometown of Chicago, which go unreported in mainstream media. The song is mellow and contemplative, with a catchy hook floating in a river of questions that don’t seem to get an answer. Other highlights on the album include the party-starter “Juice”, which soundtracks a hilarious and heartwarming video of Chance handing out roses to people on the streets of Chicago; the funky bass grooves of “NaNa”, featuring Action Bronson (or is that Ghostface?); and “Chain Smoker” whose “bridge” section I will defy anyone not to get hyped on. Finally coming to “Everything’s Good (Good Ass Outro)”, the album closes on a feel-good note, with everything feeling just about right. All in all, I highly recommend you take a trip through Acid Rap, and keep a tab on this Bennett kid, ’cause he’s goin’ places.

Download Acid Rap for FREE here!

greatgatsbysoundtrackomg

Too ‘Modern’ for the 1920s?

Jay-Z, Andre 300, Beyonce, will.i.am, Fergie, The xx, Florence and the Machine, Lana Del Ray, and Jack White.

Now, lets mull on those artists a bit… What comes to mind? Obviously the Roaring 20′s, right? Wrong! Or, at least it would have been up until May 1, 2013. Director Baz Luhrmann decided to shake up his interpretation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel, ‘The Great Gatsby’ with a ‘young’ and ‘modern’ musical vibe. Was this choice a hit or miss? Two viewer based websites took a poll and the responses varied largely. Rotten Tomatoes gave the film a painful 34% out of 100%, while imdb.com awarded it an impressive 7.5 out of 10. What causes such a large disparity among viewers? My opinion, the soundtrack.

I personally loved the film and its soundtrack, but many viewers (of all ages I might add!) felt the soundtrack pulled the audience out of the story with its distracting dupstep beats and multi-layered rap/full orchestra compositions. Luhrmann has been known to add a ‘fresh twist’ on films set in different time periods, such as  Moulin Rouge and Romeo + Juliet. Viewer’s opinions of these films vary, but a unanimous amount agreed that the beautiful cinematography was the breath and heartbeat of both films. I agree that The Great Gatsby also possessed a magical visual quality that could entrance any audience member, but whether the soundtrack kept you in that world is up to you!

 

Disclosure's "Settle"

Disclosure’s “Settle”

After dropping single after single, brothers Howard and Guy Lawrence have finally come through with their debut album. Filled with the sounds of UK’s past, the album draws heavily on UK Garage and deep house, and infuses it with the best pop vocalists the UK has to offer right now. Not only do the Lawrence brothers produce a mean house track, but they also display a gift for pop sensibilities; “Settle” is impeccably sequenced, both opening and finishing strong, with their instrumental tracks smartly placed to highlight the numerous guest vocalists on the album. A standout track is “Latch” featuring vocals by Sam Smith – check it out:

Disclosure’s live set has also picked up steam, with the duo amassing an ever growing collection of live instruments to liven up the traditionally stale visual aesthetic of most electronic shows – this is not just a couple dudes hunched over a laptop. If you are able to catch them live I recommend you do!

“Settle” was released June 3rd and is available in all the usual formats – MP3, CD, and LP.

Chance-The-Rapper-Acid-Rap

From MJ to MJ: Take a Chance on “Acid Rap”

Chancelor Bennett is not old enough to buy alcohol. Chances are (heh), he probably doesn’t remember when mixtapes were actually tapes. Despite all of this, Bennett, better known as Chance the Rapper, recently released his highly-anticipated second tape Acid Rap. Following up his highly-acclaimed first tape 10Day, whose title is a reference to the amount of time he was suspended from school, during which time he recorded it, Acid Rap (whose title comes from the fact that Chance did a whole lot of LSD during the albums writing and recording process) takes his music to another level, filled with scratchy, soulful samples, clever wordplay, and high-profile guest spots. Beginning with uptempo, Beyonce-esque vocals ushering in opening track “Good Ass Intro”, the album oozes good vibes, with a chorus featuring an ecstatic Chance chanting “you did it, you did it/you did a good-ass job” (Fun fact: “Good-Ass Job was a working – and in my opinion much better – title for Kanye West’s 2010 album My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy). The album quickly moves into highlight “Pusha Man”, likely a callback to Curtis Mayfield, and a two minute fast-paced banger which quickly ends and we’re left with fifteen seconds of silence before secret track “Paranoia” begins. Here, Chance gets serious for a bit, lamenting the murders that happen every summer in his hometown of Chicago, which go unreported in mainstream media. The song is mellow and contemplative, with a catchy hook floating in a river of questions that don’t seem to get an answer. Other highlights on the album include the party-starter “Juice”, which soundtracks a hilarious and heartwarming video of Chance handing out roses to people on the streets of Chicago; the funky bass grooves of “NaNa”, featuring Action Bronson (or is that Ghostface?); and “Chain Smoker” whose “bridge” section I will defy anyone not to get hyped on. Finally coming to “Everything’s Good (Good Ass Outro)”, the album closes on a feel-good note, with everything feeling just about right. All in all, I highly recommend you take a trip through Acid Rap, and keep a tab on this Bennett kid, ’cause he’s goin’ places.

Download Acid Rap for FREE here!

deerhunter

Deerhunter – Monomania

Deerhunter / Monomania /  Out via 4AD on May 7th, 2013

Like any well-oiled pop machine, Atlanta’s avant-garage outfit Deerhunter knows when to slowly gas the psych propellers into an ambient blissout, and bust out pedal-to-the-metal spurts of pure punk rock as soon as the lighters get raised. The band’s fifth studio album Monomania dropped May 7th via 4AD, this time forgoing the astral plane explorations of their sonically anarchic back catalog, and opting instead for a more concise pop record that snaps and crackles in equal measure. The interstellar improv and dream pop sensibility that once resonated at galactic proportions in earlier releases is tighter than ever, as though transmissions between ground control and the International Space Station achieved a crystal-clear moment of recognition, to produce a new release that is surprisingly grounded.

Amidst the bray of garage-punk snarls and slow burning shoegaze longplayers of recent days, it’s hard to tell if and when the genetics of alt rock will see the promise of mutation. In a culture-jamming return to form,  frontman Bradford Cox told Rolling Stone that he and guitarist Lockett Pundt listened to only The Ramones and Ricky Nelson prior to making the album, and also cited Pierre Schaeffer, Steve Reich, and Bo Diddley as major influences. In fact, Cox referred to Diddley as “the god of this record,” but added, “I don’t think there’s a single Bo Diddley beat on the album.” Regardless of its precise coordinates, Monomania is a refreshingly relaxed moment amidst the fluorescent junk-pop riffs and celestial loops that combine to form Deerhunter’s weird era of psych-rock ephemera.

Feedback freakouts “Neon Junkyard” and “Leather Jacket II” open the band’s sixth studio album with freshly sharpened bite, pedaling onward without a moment’s fiery respite. Third track “The Missing” casts a synth-soaked ray of sunshine into the shimmering sea of kraut grooves that comprised Pundt’s 2012 release Spooky Action at a Distance, drifting into the hustle and creak of “Pensacola” and “Dream Captain”, freak folk Americana jams sporting a looser, garagey feel that evokes the DIY tape hiss of psych-rock contemporaries Woods. Saloon waltz “T.H.M.”, the meandering strings of “Sleepwalking”, and tightly capped jam “Back in the Middle” tread familiar ground in the newgaze post-explorations of Deerhunter’s back catalog. Five-minute title drone “Monomania” trickles into the cavernous cassette echo of “Nikebike”, proceeding through dirge to draw open the ultraviolet shades of “Punk (La Vie Antérieure)” for a final wave as the sun sets over a decidedly “avant-garde rock & roll record”, according to vocalist Bradford Cox in a recent interview with Rolling Stone. If their 2010 release Halcyon Digest didn’t hammer your tympanic threshold into metronomic submission, let the message ring forevermore that while indie festival darlings are only beginning to touch on the apache anthems and art-rock tinkering of the early 2000’s, Deerhunter continues make giant leaps forward, without all the white noise to mute their sonic footprint.

red440

KZSC Jazz Charts 5/6 and Featured Artist Sarah Elizabeth Charles

All of the cats at KZSC have been enjoying a huge influx of the finest jazz in lieu of the recent JAM (Jazz Appreciation Month) of April. Now that April has ended, the fun hasn’t stopped in May and we continue to recieve tons of titles from our promoters!

Here, some of the most popular plays are listed:

1 ELDAR DJANGIROV Breakthrough
2 MARC BERNSTEIN Hymn For Life
3 HEATHER MASSE AND DICK HYMAN Lock My Heart
4 JANE MONHEIT The Heart Of The Matter
5 ANTHONY BRANKER AND WORD PLAY Uppity
6 LISA HILTON Getaway
7 MADELEINE PEYROUX The Blue Room
8 MICHAEL BLANCO No Time Like the Present
9 SARAH ELIZABETH CHARLES Red
10 MIKROKOLEKTYW Absent Minded
Among these is a very talented artist recently featured here at KZSC, and goes by the name Sarah Elizabeth Charles. Emerging from the vibrant jazz scene of New York City and producing through Truth Revolution Records, Sarah recently completed a tour of the west coast going through Seattle, San Francisco, Berkeley AND she even came up to our lovely little KZSCabin in the woods! Her recent recording of the album “RED” with her quartet is certainly something worth listening to. We completed a studio interview last week, which should air on my show Stirrin’ the Soup on Thursday 2-4pm.
Sarah has already played some of the greatest venues in NYC, including Dizzy’s, the Blue Note and the Iridium. Her expression doesn’t stop at RED- I’m told that there is more to look forward to the end of this year and the the following.As usual, the jazz/blues department at KZSC is committed to keeping things fresh…We are receiving nothing but the newest recordings from all over the country and we want to spin them for YOU! If you want to hear it all, tune into some of the great shows throughout the week:Your favorite kind of American folk music on American Spirit, Wednesdays 9am-12pm
A mix that contains non-GMO soul on Stirrin the Soup, 2-4 pm Thursdays.
See how it’s all related on Not So Distant Relatives, Fridays 2-4pm.
The finest women of jazz on Jazz Kitty, Saturdays 12-2pm.
Still want more??? We know you do. Check out the program schedule in the tab at the top of this page to see what else is cookin’.We thank you for listening, we thank the artists for swinging, and the promoters for mailing. Until next time.