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Latest World Music

imageHow’s your spring break? If the pollen count and your allergies are keeping you inside, you can still sit back and travel the globe like a jet setter with new releases discovered by the KZSC World Music Department. Tops this week are the funky-jazzy Canadian group Souljazz Orchestra, traditional/original Nubian musicians Alsarah & The Nubatones, and Las Cafeteras’ self released album full of Afro-Mexican rhythms. Forget the pollen count; here’s the Top Ten Count of new World Music CDs:

1 SOULJAZZ ORCHESTRA Inner Fire
2 ALSARAH AND THE NUBATONES Silt
3 LAS CAFETERAS It’s Time
4 TINARIWEN Emmaar
5 JAMAZE Around The World
6 BEATS ANTIQUE A Thousand Faces, Act I
7 BOSSACUCANOVA Our Kind Of Bossa
8 VAADAT CHARIGIM The World Is Well Lost
9 RODRIGO Y GABRIELA  9Dead Alive
10 ANGELIQUE KIDJO Eve

And if you’re looking for a strong dose of cumbia, check out this Oakland based group: LA MISA NEGRA “Misa de Medianoche”

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Extra Large March 15th

“Extra large what?” Well, this isn’t a “what”, it’s a “who”. Local favorites Extra Large have been called “uniquely Santa Cruz” by serving up their supersized sound of reggae, Latin, hip-hop, funk, and rock for years. Voted “Best Band” for many years by Santa Cruz Weekly and Good Times readers, Extra Large blends original material with creative takes on covers that are so funky you just gotta dance. Find out in person when Extra Large plays at Don Quixote’s International Music Hall  in Felton Saturday, March 15th. Showtime is 7 pm. Check out this selection from their first album “Dance to the Spin” https://soundcloud.com/vlealxl/dance-to-the-spin

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Henry: My Hero

Have you ever wondered what kind of spider that is in your bedroom window? Is it a wolf spider? Is it a black widow? (If you responded yes to the last question, kill the spider immediately. Please.)  No matter what species of spider encroaches on your personal space, you have to admit–it’s nice having him around. His name might be Henry. He might be a bulbous orb weaver (Google images of “orb weaver,” I dare you). A few things about Henry are definite. He’s there every evening when you get home from a long day of work. He always says the right things. He knows you pretty well–that you try to match your underwear to your socks but the blues are a little bit off, that you watch Big Bang Theory very late at night. Your spider hates you for that, by the way; one of his eight tiny legs face palms his tiny face. But he’ll never judge you. He’ll watch you and lure you in with his exotic ways and love you from afar until you love him back. Kind of like KZSC. Both Henry and KZSC are delightfully predictable, even when you’re Facebook stalking Marty O’Reilly (http://martyoreilly.com/): they can always be found on the web.

Check out The Cruz Report Tuesday nights 8-8:30pm.

 

north pacific string band

Local Santa Cruz band North Pacific String Band releases debut album “Steak & Eggs”!

photo by Blake Goodmacher; featured image by Yasamine June

“Sure, sure…fersherrsure,” the boys of North Pacific String Band mumbled enthusiastically when asked to play some more tunes on my show, Pickin on the Porch with Auntie Em, a few weeks back.

The five-piece string band consists of Steven Stubblefield on mandolin and vocals, Jeff Wilson on banjo, Alex Bice on upright bass and vocals, Evan Penza on guitar and vocals, and Jan Purat on fiddle and vocals. All these boys live locally within Santa Cruz County and have played many houseshows, on-campus shows at the UC, and gigs at local music venues. This summer, they packed up and headed out to tour throughout Northern California and Oregon. When they came back to release their debut album “Steak & Eggs” on August 22, I asked them to come hang out on KZSC’s own bluegrass show.

In the times between being gratefully serenaded by the band in the studio, I asked a few questions about the recording & production process and the tour.

All thirteen original tracks were recorded live with two microphones in the Corralitos Grange Hall. This specific place was acceptable to bassist Alex after clapping his hands a bit and recognizing its “sweet wood tones.” And the central coast of California in general provides as North Pacific’s key source of inspiration–what they like to call “central coast ramblin'” with all its trees and ocean and big blue skies.

When I asked about their favorite show played while on tour, I remembered that the best gigs aren’t always planned. They all agreed on a scenic overlook at a truck stop near Manzanita, Oregon. The crowd’s energy was on cue; everyone was feeling NPSB’s impromptu busking. After seeing these boys play more than a few times, I can attest that a spontaneous, outdoor setting that revolves around nature’s beauty is precisely where they flourish most.

Of course, North Pacific String Band did not forget to mention the lasting relationships made and incredible musicianship witnessed at the Northwest String Summit festival put on by Yonder Mountain String Band in Oregon. One can only imagine the plethora of amazing stringy sounds heard that weekend in August. And get this–NPSB played music on top of the Further tour bus. Cool?! I’d say these boys have their priorities set straight.

Back in the air-room at KZSC, North Pacific played a few songs they worked on while on the road called “Goin’ to the West” and “Big South Skies.” Then they got down to their song “Murphy” (track 2 on “Steak & Eggs”) with more elongated notes and gritty, bluesy chops. They slowed it down to the point where it sounded like their instruments were talking to each other (which I’ve noticed these boys do a lot–they work together beautifully). They built up the tension little by little then picked it up again with some groovin’ guitar slaps, sweet harmonic fiddle/banjo duo, delicate mando chopping, and finished it off with Alex’s heavy bass punctuation.

Stevee, Jeff, Alex, Jan, and Evan have been playing together for a while, have had time to experience lasting memories, and are individually pretty damn funny characters themselves. North Pacific String Band incorporates a “prograssive” sound to their bluegrass–and sometimes jazzy–roots, making sure to give each member solo time to shine, while keeping a youthful humor that the audience utilizes in its own stomp and clap. Their sound is coherent, tight, and undeniably heartfelt; you can really hear the feeling in the melodies and accompanying harmonies.

Check out North Pacific String Band for more information, merch, and show dates at northpacificcompany.org!