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autotheism

Loud Rock Charts: 8/14

Is it just me, or is it getting HOT AS BALLS? (Cue Nelly) Summer is getting fairly close to ending, so it should not be getting this damn hot. Speaking of hotness, my interview with The Contortionist’s lead singer is up for all those interested. Okay, that’s the last time I shamelessly plug it. I swear. Until my next interview.

ADDS
1 FACELESS Autotheism Sumerian
2 KORPIKLAANI Manala Nuclear Blast
3 LOUDNESS Eve To Dawn FrostByte
4 DARKNESS BY OATH Near Death Experience Metal Blade
5 BLACK LIGHT BURNS The Moment You Realize You’re Going To Fall Rocket Science

 

CHARTS

1 PERIPHERY  Periphery II: This Time It’s Personal Sumerian
2 CONTORTIONIST Intrinsic eOne
3 TESTAMENT Dark Roots Of Earth Nuclear Blast
4 GOJIRA L’Enfant Sauvage Roadrunner
5 HELLYEAH Band Of Brothers Eleven Seven
6 KING OF ASGARD …To North Metal Blade
7 DELAIN  We Are The Others Sensory
8 SERJ TANKIAN Harakiri Reprise
9 BONDED BY BLOOD Aftermath Earache
10 FOR THE FALLEN DREAMS Wasted Youth Artery

 

intrinsic

Interview with The Contortionist’s Jonathan Carpenter

Every now and then, a band comes along that just blows everyone out of the water with each musical piece that they write. Right now, that band is The Contortionist. I recently got a chance to sit down (or rather, stand up) with their lead singer, Jonathan Carpenter, to talk about their newest release, Intrinsic.

Bröötalisk: Alright, let’s cut to the chase. Intrinsic is, to say the least, a powerful record. Can you give me your though process behind the transition from Exoplanet to Intrinsic? What did you want to accomplish with this record?

Jonathan Carpenter: When we did Exoplanet, we went with the space vibe and that was something that I think, even before I was in the band, was a goal for the end result to be a sci fi type of story. With this album, we had to make a choice of where to go. It’s kind of like a novel style of music. I think we just kept the elements that makes us different and stand out and what we’re good at and finally carved out all the shit we just didn’t want to do anymore. Kinda made a new sound that represents what we enjoy playing live and what we can play live well. We wanted to push ourselves further and know that we’re getting better at writing music and performing it. We tried to get our wide range of sound in the new album and diversified it. Keyboards are definitely more pronounced this record, but they also don’t take over the album. I think overall we’re really pleased with how production and our concepts turned out.

Bröötalisk: Where Exoplanet was about the destruction of our homeworld and our search for a new one, Intrinsic is more about the human mind and how we interpret reality. What inspired you to write such a complex album? Are these kinds of thought provoking themes something you plan to do with later records?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QdnIMto1WNU

Jonathan Carpenter: There a bunch of books that I’ve read, mostly science, not necessarily science fiction, that talk about topics that are still being discovered, like neuroanatomy and different biotechnologies that are discussed on the album as far as story goes. Reading books like that inspired me to talk about things that could happen in the future. Things that could really change our daily lives and experiences of reality.

Bröötalisk: Misha Mansoor of Periphery mentioned that Intrinsic is more of a “grower album”. That is, you have to listen to it multiple times before you really understand and appreciate the record. Is that something you were going for with Intrinsic?

Jonathan Carpenter: No, I don’t think that necessarily motivated us. But we didn’t really have a goal to make music that could easily be understood either. We would ask ourselves, “Do we feel like these songs are any more commercial or simplified that represents pop music or anything that’s not thought provoking?” We still feel like the sounds and everything are very interesting and that they break expectations.

Bröötalisk: Speaking of Misha, he always speaks very highly of your band. Is it safe to say that The Contortionist and Periphery and are BFFs?

Jonathan Carpenter: Haha yeah, that’s a good term to describe it. Whenever we’ve toured with them, things were amazing. We got along really well. Buddying up with everybody in the tour. That was an amazing tour in general, but Periphery was definitely great to us. It was a lot of fun.

Bröötalisk: Is that when you first met the band?

Jonathan Carpenter: We had played one show with them before that, and it was just a one off day where two tours got combined randomly. It wasn’t expected. We were the first band to play out of 10 bands, so we played in front of like 15 people. They were one of the coheadliners. So yeah, we met them there, and a year later we toured together.

Bröötalisk: Many people have been speculating that Periphery and you guys might tour together some time soon. Is there any info you can give out on this?

Jonathan Carpenter: We don’t have anything solidified right now, but there have been talks between their manager and ours. Summer Slaughter was definitely something we tried to be in the running for, and unfortunately it didn’t work out this year. But who knows, maybe next year we’ll get that.

Bröötalisk:A little more off topic, I’m what you might call a vinyl enthusiast, so when I saw that Intrinsic wasn’t being pressed on vinyl, I was disappointed. Are there any future plans to release the album on vinyl?

Jonathan Carpenter: I’d imagine that’s very likely that will happen. The reason we just released a CD is because we wanted to focus on just getting it out there and then maybe later on do some secondary things and spice things up.

We just couldn’t keep our hands off of each other.

Bröötalisk: So, every time I mention that I listen to The Contortionist, almost every one seems to think I’m talking about something Cirque de Soleil. This made me wonder, where did you get the name “The Contortionist” from?

Jonathan Carpenter: I’m pretty sure that that originated from Joey, our drummer. I don’t know all the reasons for it. I think it’s kind of a mixture between sounding fucking awesome and the fact that we change our sound a lot. But I’m not really sure, it wasn’t me. I would say that it’s basically those two things. You know how it is when you have to pick out a name.

Bröötalisk: What are some of your favorite bands out there right now?

Jonathan Carpenter: There’s a lot of lighter stuff that have nothing to do with metal that I like to listen to, Deerhunter, Minus the Bear. I really like Wild Beasts a lot. As far as metal goes, the newest Textures album is still really sick, I like to jam that out. I also like Last Chance to Reason, busting out Level 2 never gets old. The new Periphery was also really awesome, I liked that. Other than that, I haven’t really been listening to music because I’ve been so busy finishing up recording. But now that that’s over, I’m starting to get back into the cycle again.

 

jovanotti

Jovanotti’s “Italia 1988-2012″: A 24-Year Retrospective

Through ATO Records, Italian singer-songwriter and rapper Lorenzo Cherubini, better known as Jovanotti, has finally issued his first U.S. release after over two decades of being in the business. This compilation album that includes the greatest hits of his career so far, aptly titled “Italia 1988-2012″. Initial tracks like “Con La Luce Negli Occhi” and “Sulla Frontiera” are very energetic and contribute to the album’s generally light-hearted feel. Meanwhile, other tracks like “Mi Fido Di Te” and “La Porta É Aperta” take it down a notch and show Jovanotti’s softer side, complete with acoustic guitars and even some backing vocals. With Jovanotti’s own nonchalant and distinct style of rapping in just about every track, this quasi-greatest-hits-collection is not to be missed.

Vacationer1

A “Vacationer” Vacation In < 3 Minutes…

I’m making my way via automobile up to Oregon for a mini-vacation. Nothing too lavish—I’ll be gone less than a week and still be in a separate hemisphere than the Bahamas. But it’s just enough time to get away from that plague of the everyday here in Surf City, where others come to get away. If you haven’t had time to squeeze in any summer merriment yet this season, I have good news.   Vacationer, a Philadelphia-based dream pop band just dropped their new music video. The goods in question? A catchy little ditty called “Trip” is the bands first single. Vacationer partnered with self-proclaimed international community  Lomography, passionately dedicated to antique photography. The video was shot on Lomokino 35mm film. All you Instagrammers out there take heed: this gritty and fun (and grainy, saturated and gorgeous) old-school video makes you want to lay out in the sunshine with a retro bathing suit.

Pasatempo

Pasatempo Thurs July 19th

From the soggy town of Seattle comes Pasatempo, a band specializing in old-style music from the Greek underworld, known as “Rebetika” along with other music from the Balkans. They’ll be in concert at Don Quixote’s in Felton, CA on Thursday, July 19th, 2012 at 7:30pm. Led by the husband and wife team of Christos Govetas (vocals, bouzouki and baglama) and Ruth Hunter (vocals, accordion and former member of the Santa Cruz Balkan band Medna Usta) the ensemble also includes Dave Bartley (guitar), Hank Bradley (“The Poison Coyote Kid” on bouzouki), Steve Ramsay (baglama) and Bill Lanphier (double bass) for that wall of emotional sound reflecting the full gamut of sorrow and joy.

israeli flag

Weezer…in Hebrew!

It is very common for contemporary World Music artists to remake popular American songs while still staying true to their culture. With YouTube, it’s been easier than ever to find up-and-coming artists sharing their cultural talents in a more mainstream medium. The Sharon Holzman band is an example; they have covered Weezer’s classic hit “Say It Ain’t So” in their native tongue, Hebrew. In doing so, they have taken a song that has been played a seemingly infinite number of times on commercial radio over the past decade and have given it a refreshing twist. Check it out!