New KZSC merch is here!

It’s here! It’s finally here! During our Fall Pledge Drive (now through October 20th) you can pledge to the Great 88 and receive our new special edition KZSC shirt and a new take on our old favorite KZSC “peel slowly and see” design: a tote bag!

Our new tee shirt comes in a navy blue, with contrasting white and orange print to display your love of KZSC. The design is a nod to a legendary college radio station in NYC that provided early exposure for what became some of the biggest names in hip-hop. The design is printed on a 50/50 blend that won’t shrink!


And, we’re bringing the tote bag back! A canvas bag with our beloved Andy Warhol/Velvet Underground-inspired banana slug shows off both your love of music, and appreciation of the Santa Cruz banana slug. The 11-inch, over-the-shoulder handles and 15.5″ x 14.5″ x 7″ size allows you to haul your LPs, CDs, cassettes, groceries, or any other items! Rep your favorite local, non-commerical, community radio station everywhere you go.


Make a pledge now to KZSC online, or by calling (831) 459-2811 to show your support!


Fall Schedule is a Go!


Lots of great music, news, and community creativity is on tap for KZSC’s fall program schedule. We’ve got everything from Minimal to Metal — and that’s just our Monday lineup!

We’re live now with this line up, through January 15th, 2017. We’ll mail out copies to all of our donors from the past two fundraisers, thanks! Don’t forget, the Fall Fundraiser that starts Tuesday October 11th – show us you care about creative community radio with a donation!

If you want to print your own copy now, here’s a link to a nicely formatted pdf version.


KZSC’s Fall Schedule [Oct 3 2016 through Jan 15, 2017]


KZSC's Odessey and Oracle LP - now autographed!!

Hear The Zombies interviewed on KZSC

On September 7th, Carol from KZSC’s Test of Time and Keith from Moon Majoon spoke with 1960s pop legends, The Zombies. It was hours before their show at The Catalyst with Bruce Sudano opening that they visited our studios. The Zombies regularly get named, alongside The Beatles and The Beach Boys, as the having the best songs and vocal harmonies of the 1960s. In the interview they speak about how those other two bands’ studio innovations directly benefitted the recording of The Zombies’ Odessey and Oracle.

Rod Argent and Colin Blunstone, who together represent more than 100 years of professional musicianship, also share the story of the founding and dissolution of the Zombies and traced some of the impact that British jazz and choral music had on their songwriting and performing. We also learned what it was like to work with the infamously tyrannical director Otto Preminger, and how the Zombies stood up to him.

Programmer of the Month: Art O’Sullivan

The Golden Road’s Art O’Sullivan moved to Santa Cruz to attend UCSC as an alternative academic experience, but the ocean, redwoods and counterculture kept him here. Upon first listening to KZSC, Art was drawn to the alternative music, talk and special format programming.

He started programming The Golden Road on June 18, 1997 as a 30th anniversary celebration of the Monterey International Pop Festival–the same festival that made stars of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Ravi Shankar and Otis Redding. Art’s musical taste ranges from A to Z (The Association to Frank Zappa); he loves The Grateful Dead, classic rock (Eric Clapton, The Rolling Stones, Dire Straits), blues (Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, early Fleetwood Mac), hard rock (Midnight Oil, The Who), and punk rock (The Clash, forever). He likes to feature upbeat and melodic songs, live performances, and long jams on The Golden Road, every Wednesday from 3 to 6 pm this summer. He also appreciates jazz, folk, Celtic, African, Brazilian and Caribbean styles.

As a writer, an editor, and an animal rights advocate, Art has written PSAs for KZSC about animal welfare, and other issues close to his heart. Art has also contributed to the Metro alternative newspaper, covering topics such as The Grateful Dead archives, the 10th anniversary of Jerry Garcia’s passing, animal welfare, cats, and the invasion of Iraq. Art was on the air, programming a show called Earwax during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. Art’s columns, criticism and commentary in Metro Santa Cruz won an award from the California Newspaper Publishers Association and he was voted the third Best Writer in Santa Cruz by Metro readers in 2005. He’s traveled extensively, making friends on four continents–Art is pretty sure the world is round, and “Love that’s real will not fade away.”

– Abraham

Photo: Hypnotica Studios Infinite


Truly “old skool” college radio.

On September 8th, Harvard University turns 380! So it is rather fitting that such a venerable institution would also have 8 decades of broadcasting under its belt. In 1940, the Harvard Crimson Network, WHCN, was one of America’s first college radio stations. In 1943 there was a change of call letters to, WHRV (Harvard Radio Voice). Then, on February 1st of 1951, WHRB was born. But it was not until 1957 that the Harvard Radio Broadcasting Company Incorporated acquired a commercial FM license at 107.1 (which was moved over to 95.3 a few years later).

With such a long history, it is no surprise that WHRB has some historic programs. Hillbilly at Harvard is a country music show that started all the way back in 1948!


Then there is, Sunday Night at the Opera, which has been on the airwaves for over 50 years now. And it sure shows when you see the size of the station’s classical music collection; truly extensive and probably one of the largest of its kind among college radio stations.

Since 1994 WHRB has been in the basement of Pennypacker Hall, just a minute walk from the heart of Harvard Square. The hall was built in 1927 and Harvard acquired it in 1958. My guess is that the station has one of the most unusual lay outs in all of college radio. There is a small maze of corners to turn and short hallways to walk down, leading to unlabeled doorways. Behind most of these doors are rooms containing the separate parts of WHRB’s music library.


WHRB publishes its schedule three times a year, and it has to be the most densely packed and well detailed program guide of any college radio station in the nation. We are talking the really fine print. Plus, each Winter and Spring feature “orgies” in which concentrated blocks of air time are devoted to a whole host of composers, artists, genres, subjects, concepts etc. It’s a tradition that is the stuff of legend. Back in 1943, as the story goes, an undergrad was so happy to have passed some rather difficult exams, he went ahead and played all 9 of Beethoven’s symphonies in a row. So, as a nod to this legend, the “orgy periods” are timed to coincide with major exams because the station actually gets short staffed with all the students out taking tests. Because, I have to guess, that graduating from Harvard is even harder than getting into Harvard.

Many thanks to Robby Erikson for showing me around the station.



Above the door to the station

The 88 point ones…

A quick wiki count of all the radio stations in the USA that broadcast at eighty-eight point one FM, and you’ll come up with nearly three hundred. No doubt it’s a diverse bunch. Some are religious, some broadcast from inside native American reservations and some are college radio stations.

Recently, it was my great pleasure to visit MIT’s, 88.1, WMBR. Originally, there was an AM station, WMIT, broadcasting within the footprint of the campus way back in 1946. WMIT was replaced by, WTBS (Technology Broadcasting System) in April of 1961. Then, in the late 1970s, the station was approached by media mogul Ted Turner. You see Ted wanted to call his new TV station, the Turner Broadcasting System. Long story short, after some negotiations, since you can’t sell call letters, donations were made which went right into some greatly needed upgrades. Thus, “Walker Memorial Basement Radio” was born. Said basement has three studios, AND contains, what has to be, one of the largest music libraries in all of college radio, with more than 100,000 LPs and a similar number of CDs in their library! But, it hasn’t just been prerecorded material going out of the air waves all the time. For many years the station has opened its doors to hundreds of bands for live broadcasts. In fact, WMBR’s show, Pipeline! is celebrating 25 years of live & local rock music programming with a series of 13 shows, featuring 80 acts in all, in 5 different venues over the course of 5 weekends, Sept. 12th through Oct. 12th, 2016.

Cheers to WMBR and to the General Manager, Jon Beaulieu. It was great to hang out for a bit & talk college radio.

  • Above WMBR’s door

  • Jon Beaulieu, WMBR’s General Manager

  • One of three studios at WMBR

  • Part of WMBR’s 100,000-strong LP library